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Article
October 1952

CHRONIC ULCERS OF THE LEG ASSOCIATED WITH BLOOD DYSCRASIAS

Author Affiliations

With the Technical Assistance of Florence Simm, B.A. BROOKLYN

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, New York University Post-Graduate Medical School (Chairman, Dr. Marion B. Sulzberger), and the Skin and Cancer Unit of the University Hospital.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1952;66(4):478-487. doi:10.1001/archderm.1952.01530290054007
Abstract

BLOOD dyscrasias, particularly the congenital hemolytic anemias,1 are of primary importance in a consideration of the possible causes of chronic recurrent ulcers of the leg. An association of leg ulcers with sickle cell anemia is generally better appreciated than the relationship of this symptom to other forms of congenital hemolytic anemia, e. g., congenital hemolytic icterus (familial acholuric jaundice, spherocytic anemia) and Mediterranean disease (Cooley's anemia, thalassemia).

In a review of the subject of indolent ulcers of the leg in diseases of the blood, in addition to the conditions already mentioned, Gendel2 lists the following: Banti's syndrome, thrombocytopenic purpura, Gaucher's disease, pernicious anemia, and chronic hemolytic polycythemia. The latter was presented before the Royal Society of Medicine by Rau, Pulvertaft and Humble.3 Gendel2 did not include polycythemia vera (erythremia, Osler-Vaquez disease). However, ulcerations of the lower extremities4 and peripheral vascular complications have

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