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Article
November 1952

THE ADVERSE INFLUENCE OF SYPHILITIC INFECTION ON THE LONGEVITY OF MICE AND MEN

Author Affiliations

NEW BRITAIN, CONN.

From the Laboratories of the New Britain General Hospital and the Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1952;66(5):547-568. doi:10.1001/archderm.1952.01530300003001
Abstract

SYPHILIS is a chronic granulomatous infection. In man it has the potentiality of producing anatomical alterations in almost all organ systems. It may evoke a variety of clinical symptoms and signs which place it among the easiest, yet sometimes among the most difficult, of diseases to diagnose. Many acquire syphilis, but good evidence1 indicates that the large majority of syphilitic persons, even if treatment has been denied them, do not die as a direct result of the disease. This report is concerned with mortality among syphilitic subjects and with the influence of syphilitic infection on longevity. The evidence bearing on this problem is based on clinical data and vital statistics, on autopsy observations, and on observations on the induced infection in a laboratory animal, the mouse. This evidence will be presented below.

EVIDENCE FROM CLINICAL FINDINGS AND VITAL STATISTICS

An illuminating group of reports has appeared under the

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