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Article
November 1952

IN VITRO FUNGISTATIC EFFECT OF TETRACHLOROPARABENZOQUINONE

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA

From the Communicable Disease Center, Public Health Service, Federal Security Agency.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1952;66(5):573-576. doi:10.1001/archderm.1952.01530300029003
Abstract

TETRACHLOROPARABENZOQUINONE (TCPB), marketed under the trade name ``spergon,'' has been in general use for the prevention of plant disseases, such as seed decay and ``damping-off,'' since 1940, when it was discovered by Cunningham and Sharvelle1 to be an excellent seed protectant against phytopathogenic fungi. It is a yellow crystalline solid, insoluble in water, an aqueous suspension of which assumes a violet color resulting from a gradual hydrolysis to chloranilic acid.

In 1946 Collins, McGavack, and Boyd2 reported laboratory trials of tetrachlorop-benzoquinone as a fungistatic agent against human pathogens. Serial dilutions of the compound in "nutrient dextrose agar broth" were inoculated with strains of Microsporum canis (Microsporum lanosum; Microsporum felineum), Microsporum audouini, and Trichophyton tonsurans. Minimum and maximum fungistatic concentrations were found to be 0.8% and 3.0% respectively, 8 of the 29 strains used being inhibited by 1.5%. In clinical tests, 169 patients

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