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Article
October 1953

ISONIAZID IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1953;68(4):417-420. doi:10.1001/archderm.1953.01540100057009
Abstract

CHRONIC lupus erythematosus is notoriously resistant to treatment. Until 1951, bismuth, gold, and arsenic were the principal systemic agents; second choices were suramin sodium (Naphuride),1 quinine, crude liver extract, and vitamin E; third choice was local destruction, usually with carbon dioxide. In 1951, quinacrine (Mepacrine, Atabrine) was reported by Page2 to have produced excellent results, and personal reports to us by several dermatologists indicate an increasing confirmation of good results in the United States. Any drug which offers help in the management of this disease is eagerly put to the test by those dealing with this discouraging condition.

Isoniazid was discovered to possess antituberculosis activity in vitro3 and it produced dramatic effects in man4 and in experimental animals.5 Because tuberculosis was once thought to be associated with lupus erythematosus, gold was used in the treatment of both.6 A relation between these two

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