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Article
November 1953

HEALING OF CHRONIC SICKLEMIA LEG ULCERS WITH CORTISONE THERAPY

Author Affiliations

WARRENDALE, PA.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1953;68(5):576-579. doi:10.1001/archderm.1953.01540110098016
Abstract

Sickle-cell anemia, a hereditary hemolytic anemia limited almost entirely to the Negro race, is a disease that may be so subtle as not to enter the mind of the clinician.1 Winsor and Burch aptly termed it "a great masquerader."2 It is characterized by the peculiar shape of the erythrocytes deprived of oxygen 1b and is now thought to be due to abnormal hemoglobin, differing from that found in normal erythrocytes.3 Sicklemia, the sickle-cell trait without symptoms, is said to occur in about 7% of the American Negro population,4 whereas sickle-cell anemia occurs in 1 out of 40 patients with sicklemia.5

Ever since the first case of sickle-cell anemia was described by Herrick in 1910,6 chronic leg ulcers have been considered a common complication in adolescent and adult Negroes.7 It is a more rare complication in young Negro children.

It is the purpose of

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