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Article
May 1954

PERIPORITIS STAPHYLOGENES AND OTHER COMPLICATIONS OF MILIARIA IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; PHILADELPHIA

From the New York Medical College, Department of Dermatology and Syphilology and the Metropolitan Hospital, Department of Dermatology and Syphilology (Dr. Eugene Traub, Director), New York, and the Skin and Cancer Hospital (Dr. H. H. Perlman, Chief, Pediatric Dermatology Section), Philadelphia.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1954;69(5):543-553. doi:10.1001/archderm.1954.01540170013002

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Abstract

THE SUMMER of 1952 was a record year for elevated temperature and increased humidity. As a result of this climatic record, we observed an unusual increase in the cases of miliaria and its unusual complications. While prickly heat, or "heat rash," is generally recognized as a trivial dermatosis, actually it is occasionally accompanied or followed by dangerous sequelae and discomforting complications. Grulee and Rose1 state the case: "While it does not lead to death, it certainly does prolong the state of malnutrition, and indirectly may cause a certain amount of infant mortality."

Accordingly, this paper proposes to discuss briefly miliaria and two of its complications, namely: (1) the usual case of miliaria; (2) the moderately severe type of miliaria, and (3) severe complications of miliaria, namely periporitis staphylogenes, misnamed furunculosis, impetigo contagiosa, or pemphigus neonatorum.

INCIDENCE

Miliaria, in the hospital nursery and at the home, is

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