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Article
March 1955

TRICHOPHYTON TONSURANS INFECTION OF THE SCALP: First Case Reported in Maryland

Author Affiliations

Baltimore

From the Department of Medicine (Dermatology) of the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

AMA Arch Derm. 1955;71(3):398-399. doi:10.1001/archderm.1955.01540270110021
Abstract

In the states bordering Mexico there is a high incidence of Trichophyton tonsurans infection of the scalp.* Fortunately, this serious and often protracted type of tinea capitis is rare in the eastern part of the United States. In two series reported from New York † and totaling 3,169 cases, only 9 (0.28%) were due to T. tonsurans. During 1951, 1952, and 1953 we observed and treated 452 patients with tinea capitis. Four hundred twenty-five (94%) were caused by Microsporum audouini, 21 (4.6%) by Microsporum canis, 4 (0.95%) by Microsporum gypseum, 1 (0.22%) by Trichophyton schoenleini and 1 (0.22%) by Trichophyton tonsurans.

The following case is reported in order to call attention to the possibility of an epidemic spread of T. tonsurans into the Baltimore area.

G. B., a white girl aged 8 years, consulted us on Feb. 26, 1953, complaining of bald spots and painful pustules on the scalp. For the first five years of her life she lived in California.

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