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Article
March 1955

TRICHOPHYTON TONSURANS INFECTION OF THE SCALPFirst Case Reported in Maryland

Author Affiliations

Baltimore

From the Department of Medicine (Dermatology) of the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

AMA Arch Derm. 1955;71(3):398-399. doi:10.1001/archderm.1955.01540270110021
Abstract

In the states bordering Mexico there is a high incidence of Trichophyton tonsurans infection of the scalp.* Fortunately, this serious and often protracted type of tinea capitis is rare in the eastern part of the United States. In two series reported from New York † and totaling 3,169 cases, only 9 (0.28%) were due to T. tonsurans. During 1951, 1952, and 1953 we observed and treated 452 patients with tinea capitis. Four hundred twenty-five (94%) were caused by Microsporum audouini, 21 (4.6%) by Microsporum canis, 4 (0.95%) by Microsporum gypseum, 1 (0.22%) by Trichophyton schoenleini and 1 (0.22%) by Trichophyton tonsurans.

The following case is reported in order to call attention to the possibility of an epidemic spread of T. tonsurans into the Baltimore area.

G. B., a white girl aged 8 years, consulted us on Feb. 26, 1953, complaining of bald spots and painful pustules on the scalp. For the first five years of her life she lived in California.

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