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Article
May 1955

FAILURE OF INTRAMUSCULAR TRYPSIN TO ALTER THE COURSE OF CERTAIN INFLAMMATORY DERMATOSES

AMA Arch Derm. 1955;71(5):639-640. doi:10.1001/archderm.1955.01540290079022
Abstract

The observed anti-inflammatory effects of parenteral trypsin as reported by numerous authors, including Innerfield and associates,1 Laufman and Roach,2 Fisher and Wilensky,3 Hopen and Campagna,4 and others, aroused interest in what effect this enzyme would have upon certain dermatoses characterized by a marked inflammatory component. Many of the previous studies of clinical response to trypsin had been based on both intravenous and intramuscular use of the drug. A review of the toxicity and side-effects of trypsin indicated this substance to have certain hazardous potentials and undesirable side-reactions when administered intravenously. Laufman and Roach2 reported side-effects consisting of transitory chills, abdominal cramps, and local irritation and thrombophlebitis at the site of infusion. Innerfield and associates1 noted transient facial flushing and a sense of warmth and local endophlebitis at the site of infusion. Wright,5 in a personal

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