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Article
July 1959

Calcinosis Cutis: Its Relationship to Scleroderma

Author Affiliations

Rochester, Minn.

AMA Arch Derm. 1959;80(1):15-21. doi:10.1001/archderm.1959.01560190017002
Abstract

Calcinosis cutis denotes pathologic calcification in the skin. Although its association with scleroderma has been recognized for many years as the Thibierge-Weissenbach syndrome,1 practically nothing is known about its incidence, time of onset, sites of predilection, or significance. Furthermore, the metabolic calcinosis in scleroderma has been confused with the metastatic calcinosis occurring in parathyroid disease. There are two general types of calcinosis: (1) metabolic calcinosis, associated with tissue injury, in which the concentrations of calcium and phosphorus in the serum are normal, and (2) metastatic calcinosis, in which the concentrations of calcium and phosphorus in the serum are elevated. The first type is the commoner type and occurs as a result of localized injury or as a manifestation of systemic disease, such as scleroderma or dermatomyositis. The second type rarely involves the skin, most commonly occurring in the lungs, stomach, and kidney.

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