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Article
May 1960

Histopathologic Evaluation of Griseofulvin in Microsporum Audouini Infections: Preliminary Observations

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

Professor of Dermatology, Temple University Medical Center, and Medical Director, The Skin and Cancer Hospital of Philadelphia (Dr. C. F. Burgoon); Assistant Professor of Dermatology, Temple University Medical Center, Director of Laboratory, The Skin and Cancer Hospital of Philadelphia (Dr. Graham); Fellow in Dermatology, The Skin and Cancer Hospital of Philadelphia, Unit of the Department of Dermatology, Temple University Medical Center (Dr. Keiper); Associate Professor of Dermatology, Temple University Medical Center, Assistant Medical Director, The Skin and Cancer Hospital of Philadelphia (Dr. Urbach); Consultant in Pediatrics, The Skin and Cancer Hospital of Philadelphia (Dr. J. S. Burgoon); Chief, Department of Pathology and Branch of Dermal Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C., Visiting Professor of Pathology (Dermal Pathology), Temple University Medical Center (Dr. Helwig).

AMA Arch Derm. 1960;81(5):724-732. doi:10.1001/archderm.1960.03730050080014
Abstract

Superficial dermatophytic infection of the scalp was first described as a clinical entity by Willan in 1808.21 The histopathologic alteration of the hair follicle produced by the dermatophytes has been a neglected field of investigation except for the pioneer studies of Gruby7 and Sabouraud.20

The recent upsurge in investigation aimed at exploring some of the mysteries of dermatophytic infection of the skin and dermal appendages has shaken many of the time-honored but false concepts concerning these infections. Important contributions to our knowledge have been the demonstration of fungistatic activity of long-chain, odd-numbered fatty acids which are increased in post-pubertal sebaceous glands19; the presence in the serum globulin fraction of potent antidermatophytic activity which limits dermatophytic growth to those layers of the skin outside the epidermal water barrier zone1,2,11,16,18; the natural history of infection in the human volunteer8,9; the graphic demonstration of the fallacy of

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