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Article
December 1961

Lepromatous Panniculitis

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Dermatology Service, The Presbyterian Hospital and the Department of Dermatology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Arch Dermatol. 1961;84(6):960-963. doi:10.1001/archderm.1961.01580180076012
Abstract

Although leprosy is still infrequently encountered in the United States, it is of interest that there are as many as 100 new cases diagnosed and reported to the United States Public Health Service every year.1 It would not seem inappropriate, then, to report a case of leprosy in which the presenting symptom was erythema nodosumlike lesions on the legs and arms. Although true erythema nodosum is not uncommonly associated with lepromatous leprosy, the lesions to be described evolved in a manner clinically and pathologically quite distinct from that of classical erythema nodosum.

Report of a Case*  The patient is a 30-year-old white male from Colombia, South America. He was first hospitalized at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in September, 1959. He presented with a painful, nodular eruption of 8 months' duration on the legs and arms and a history of persistent sore throat for 10 months. In addition, during the

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