[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.237.138.69. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1964

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF TEMPERATURE IN THE PATHOGENY AND THE CLINICS OF MYCOSES

Author Affiliations

Ap. 8250 Facultad de Medicina Caracas, Venezuela

Arch Dermatol. 1964;89(3):504. doi:10.1001/archderm.1964.01590270190046

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

In 1953, while working in the laboratory of Dr. J. E. MacKinnon (Montevideo), I found that Cladosporium carrionii and Madurella grisea do not grow in vitro at 37 C. From that time on, during several years, I enjoyed the feeling of tracing a new path and building a new dimension in parasitology.

Natural groups of parasitoses appeared to me as constellations in which each clinico-etiological entity occupied a distinct thermal orbit. Among human treponematoses, for example, pinta is the least thermophilic one, yaws and syphilis are the medium and the most thermophilic ones, respectively. Among leishmaniases, there are several ranks of thermophily, respectively occupied by (1) diffuse tegumentary leishmaniasis, (2) chiclero's ulcer and oriental sore, (3) American mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, and (4) kala-azar.

Among pathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium balnei, M fortuitum, M ulcerans, M leprae, M tuberculosis var. hominis, M tuberculosis var. bovis, M tuberculosis var. avium show higher and higher degrees

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×