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Article
March 1993

Skin-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (SALT)-Related B-Cell Lymphoma (Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma): A Concept and a Clinicopathologic Entity

Author Affiliations

II Department of Dermatology University of Florence Via della Pergola 58 1-50121 Firenze Italy; Institute of Morbid Anatomy and Histology University of Florence Viale G. B. Morgagni 85 50134 Firenze Italy

Arch Dermatol. 1993;129(3):353-355. doi:10.1001/archderm.1993.01680240093016
Abstract

The existence of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (pCBCL), ie, non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma primarily presenting in the skin without any clinically and/or instrumentally detectable extracutaneous localization, has been only recently accepted. Indeed, B-cell lymphomas in the skin have long been considered as a sign of progression and dissemination of lymph node disease, and thus as associated with a poor prognosis, even in the absence of clinically detectable extracutaneous lesions. Conversely, B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by good response to local treatment, absence of extracutaneous localization, and favorable prognosis have been generally considered as reactive processes, thus being defined as pseudolymphomas.1-4 The increasing use of immunohistochemistry5,6 and, quite recently, of DNA analysis7 in clinicopathologic studies dealing with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders made clear that a monoclonal restriction of the surface immunoglobulins (sIg) is present in a consistent part of these cases.8-11 Therefore, as monoclonal proliferations of B-cells, they

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