Eczematous Reaction to Intravenous Immunoglobulin: An Alternative Cause of Eczema | Dermatology | JAMA Dermatology | JAMA Network
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Observation
October 2014

Eczematous Reaction to Intravenous Immunoglobulin: An Alternative Cause of Eczema

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Dermatology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • 2Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria
  • 3Department of Dermatology, University of Luebeck, Luebeck, Germany
JAMA Dermatol. 2014;150(10):1120-1122. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2014.109

A man in his 70s presented with eczematous plaques on his face, trunk, and extremities, including erythema, fissures, and scales on his palms and soles (Figure 1). There were no blisters, erosions, or any mucosal lesions. The patient’s medical history revealed peripheral neuropathy due to Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Several days prior to the onset of skin lesions, he had been treated with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) (Intratect; Biotest), 1g/kg/d for 2days, for control of his neuropathy. There was no history of IVIG treatment, atopic dermatitis, respiratory allergies, and/or asthma. His other medications at that time, which had remained unchanged for at least 2 years, consisted of acetylsalicylic acid, simvastatin, and tamsulosin.

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