Feasibility and Acceptability of Google Glass for Emergency Department Dermatology Consultations | Dermatology | JAMA Dermatology | JAMA Network
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Research Letter
July 2015

Feasibility and Acceptability of Google Glass for Emergency Department Dermatology Consultations

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of Medical Toxicology, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, Worcester
  • 2Department of Emergency Medicine, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence
  • 3Department of Dermatology, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence
JAMA Dermatol. 2015;151(7):794-796. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.0248

Emergency department (ED)–based teledermatology has become more common in recent years because patients who present to the ED with skin concerns often require prompt diagnosis and treatment. Skin concerns make up 3.3% of ED visits; most of these patients wait months to see a dermatologist.1 Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using mobile telephones for ED teledermatology.2

Google Glass, a pair of eyeglasses with a computer, camera, and microphone built into the frame, is a wearable form of mobile video communication introduced in 2012.3 Despite significant media attention related to the use of Glass in health care settings, its value for patients and physicians has not been established.4 This study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of Glass as a communication tool for ED dermatology consultations.

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