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Research Letter
September 2017

An Anchoring-Based Intervention to Increase Patient Willingness to Use Injectable Medication in Psoriasis

Author Affiliations
  • 1Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
  • 2Department of Pathology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
  • 3Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
JAMA Dermatol. 2017;153(9):932-934. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2017.1271

Biological therapies are highly effective in treating immune-mediated diseases, such as psoriasis,1 but patients are often fearful of injections. The fear of injection is inherently subjective and may be easily modified.

Anchoring is the tendency for humans to make judgments relative to the first piece of information presented.2,3 Patients who have never taken an injection may subjectively compare taking an injection to not taking one. This comparison can be a frightening hurdle to starting an injectable medication. In a similar fashion, a $500 product (the anchor) marked down to $100 seems like a much better deal than if the product were simply offered at $100.

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