Dermatology Residency Program Characteristics That Correlate With Graduates Selecting an Academic Dermatology Career | Dermatology | JAMA Dermatology | JAMA Network
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Study
July 2006

Dermatology Residency Program Characteristics That Correlate With Graduates Selecting an Academic Dermatology Career

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Departments of Dermatology, University of California, Irvine (Dr Wu), University of Chile School of Medicine, Santiago (Dr Ramirez), and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (Drs Alonso and Tyring); Center for Clinical Studies, Houston, Tex (Drs Mendoza and Tyring); Research Department, Universidad El Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia (Dr Mendoza); and Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla (Dr Berman).

Arch Dermatol. 2006;142(7):845-850. doi:10.1001/archderm.142.7.845
Abstract

Objective  To examine the characteristics of 107 dermatology residency programs to determine which factors are correlated with producing academic dermatologists to help reverse the trend of a growing shortage of academic dermatologists.

Design  We collected data ranging from total publications to grant funding. Extensive Internet searches were completed to obtain most of the data. Individual programs were contacted as needed to obtain any missing data that were not found on the program's Web site.

Setting  Dermatology residency programs (departments and divisions) in the United States.

Main Outcome Measures  Factors that correlated with producing full-time academic dermatologists.

Results  We tabulated and analyzed characteristics of 107 dermatology residency programs. Total full-time faculty members in 2004, total publications in 2004, and total publications from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2004, were the 3 factors most strongly correlated with producing full-time faculty. National Institutes of Health and Dermatology Foundation grants and American Skin Association grant recipients were the 3 characteristics most strongly inversely correlated with producing full-time faculty. Those who entered academic dermatology tended to stay at the same program where they completed a dermatology residency, especially if this program was considered a “smaller” program.

Conclusions  The programs' characteristics of total publications in 2004 and from 2001 to 2004 were 2 of the 3 factors most strongly positively correlated with dermatology residents entering academic dermatology. Encouraging residents to publish may be a window to motivate them toward a career in academic dermatology.

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