A Retrospective Case Series Review of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Ligand Rosiglitazone in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis | Allergy and Clinical Immunology | JAMA Dermatology | JAMA Network
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Observation
January 2008

A Retrospective Case Series Review of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Ligand Rosiglitazone in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: School of Medicine (Ms Behshad) and Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals, Case Medical Center (Drs Cooper and Korman), Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio; and Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center (Dr Cooper), Cleveland.

Arch Dermatol. 2008;144(1):84-88. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2007.22
Abstract

Background  Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that are expressed in a variety of cells, including keratinocytes and cells of the immune system. The γ subtype, activated by the antidiabetic thiazolidinediones, was originally identified as a regulator of adipogenesis and glucose homeostasis. Recent data, however, have linked PPAR-γ to several genes involved in inflammation. Among others, these pathways reduce certain inflammatory mediators in the skin and regulate epidermal barrier homeostasis, alterations of which contribute to the inflammation associated with atopic dermatitis (AD). To our knowledge, the addition of rosiglitazone maleate to the standard treatment of AD has not been evaluated.

Observations  Severe adverse events were not observed, although 1 patient experienced weight gain. All patients responded to rosiglitazone therapy with decreased total body surface area involvement, severity of lesions, and number of flares.

Conclusions  Rosiglitazone, a drug that has an excellent safety profile, may offer a well tolerated systemic treatment option for AD. However, its role should be further assessed in controlled trials to establish its efficacy and safety in this disease.

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