Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Multiple Eccrine Poromas in a Patient With Chronic Graft-vs-Host Disease and Immunosuppression | Allergy and Clinical Immunology | JAMA Dermatology | JAMA Network
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Research Letter
September 20, 2010

Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Multiple Eccrine Poromas in a Patient With Chronic Graft-vs-Host Disease and Immunosuppression

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: The University of Texas Southwestern, Austin (Dr Diamantis); Department of Dermatology (Drs Richmond and Rady), The University of Texas Medical School at Houston (Dr Diamantis); Departments of Dermatology, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, and Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (Dr Tyring); and Departments of Pathology (Drs Cutlan and Torres-Cabala) and Dermatology (Drs Torres-Cabala and Hymes), The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston.

Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(1):120-122. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2010.383

A poroma is a benign sweat gland tumor composed of cells with terminal ductal differentiation of either apocrine or eccrine origin. Poromas are usually solitary, slow-growing, skin-colored, sometimes pedunculated papules or plaques. Multiple poromas, or eccrine poromatosis, rarely develop in a widespread distribution: 2 cases of eccrine poromatosis have been reported in the setting of chronic immunosuppression1,2; 3 additional reports document the development of multiple eccrine poromas after external irradiation.3-5

Our patient developed multiple eccrine poromas after treatment with an allogeneic stem cell transplant with complications of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) requiring long-term immunosuppression. The poromas were tested for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and results were positive for beta-HPV. An actinic keratosis and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in situ tested by nested PCR were negative for beta-HPV. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of HPV positivity in eccrine poromas.

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