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August 2019 - January 1920

Decade

Year

Issue

March 1, 2011, Vol 147, No. 3, Pages 276-370

Editorial

Cutaneous Signs of Hematologic Malignancies: “Doctor, Is There Something Wrong With My Blood?”

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):342-344. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.25
Study

Usefulness of BP230 and BP180-NC16a Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays in the Initial Diagnosis of Bullous Pemphigoid: A Retrospective Study of 138 Patients

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):286-291. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.23

Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Combination of Bullous Pemphigoid Antigens 1 and 2 in the Diagnosis of Bullous Pemphigoid

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):293-298. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.21

Remission in Dermatitis Herpetiformis: A Cohort Study

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):301-305. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2010.336
ObjectivesTo determine the percentage of patients with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) who experience at least 2 years of remission and to identify factors associated with DH remission.DesignRetrospective cohort study.SettingNational Institutes of Health (NIH).PatientsPatients seen at the NIH during the 1972-2010 period who had clinical findings consistent with DH, whose normal skin showed the presence of granular IgA deposits at the dermoepidermal junction on direct immunofluorescence (DIF) examination, whose age of disease onset was known, who had DH for at least 2 years, and who were followed up for at least 3 years after the initial NIH visit.Main Outcome MeasureRemission, defined as absence of skin lesions and symptoms of DH for more than 2 years while not taking sulfones (dapsone or sulfoxone), sulfapyridine, anti–tumor necrosis factor agents, or oral steroids and not adhering to a gluten-free diet.ResultsAmong 86 patients, in 10 (12%) the disease underwent remission (95% confidence interval, 6%-20%). Factors associated with DH remission included DH age of onset at 39 years or older vs onset at ages 8 to 38 years (unadjusted P = .02; adjusted P = .07) and DH onset year between 1960 and 1972 vs onset between 1935 and 1959 or after 1972 (P = .02 for global comparison of 4 onset-year groups).ConclusionsDermatitis herpetiformis can go into remission. Clinicians should attempt to wean patients with well-controlled DH from a gluten-free diet and/or use of sulfones or other therapies to determine if the DH might have remitted. Our findings provide insight into the pathogenesis and course of this disease and may serve to guide long-term management of patients with DH.

Nonspecific Capillary Proliferation and Vasculopathy Indicate Skin Hypoxia in Erythromelalgia

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):309-314. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2010.337
ObjectiveTo report on the histopathologic findings of affected skin in consecutively collected biopsy specimens from 49 patients with erythromelalgia (EM).DesignSkin biopsy specimens were obtained from the foot arch and analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy, and electron microscopy.SettingOslo University Hospital–Gaustad, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.ParticipantsThirty-one patients had primary EM, 17 patients had secondary EM, and 1 patient had erythromelalgic syndrome.Main Outcome MeasureEvidence of microvascular abnormalities in skin biopsy specimens.ResultsLight microscopy showed evidence of capillary proliferation in 10 of 31 patients with primary EM and in 1 of 17 patients with secondary EM. The biopsy specimen from the patient with erythromelalgic syndrome showed numerous capillary nests with endothelial cell defects and a slight perivascular inflammatory reaction. Among the 17 secondary EM cases, sparse perivascular lymphocyte infiltrations were observed in the biopsy specimens from 2 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia and 1 patient with diabetes mellitus. Eleven patients also had signs of vasculopathy based on findings of immunodeposits of C3 and fibrin. Six of 30 patients with primary EM showed endothelial abnormalities on electron microscopy. All 3 investigations showed unremarkable biopsy results in 16 cases.ConclusionsHistopathologic analysis is not useful as a routine diagnostic tool in EM because no morphological changes are specific to EM. The capillary proliferation and vasculopathy are assumed to be a consequence of intermittent skin hypoxia (vascular hypothesis of pathogenesis). Whether the proliferation is a consequence of EM or a pathogenic factor in the development of the disease is uncertain.
skINsight

Human Papillomavirus–Induced Lesions on Tattoos May Show Features of Seborrheic Keratosis

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):370. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.17
The Cutting Edge: Challenges in Medical and Surgical Therapies

Treatment of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis With Fumaric Acid Esters

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):282-284. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.27
Research Letter

Melanoma Quality of Life: Pilot Study Using Utility Measurements

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):353-354. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2010.340

Corkscrew Hair: A New Dermoscopic Sign for Diagnosis of Tinea Capitis in Black Children

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):355-356. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.31

Practice Gaps—Trichoscopy in Clinical Care: Comment on “Corkscrew Hair”

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):356. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.19
Observation

Efficacy of Ablative Laser Treatment in Galli-Galli Disease

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):317-320. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.3

Generalized Acquired Cutis Laxa Associated With Multiple Myeloma With Biphenotypic IgG- λ and IgA-κ Gammopathy Following Treatment of a Nodal Plasmacytoma

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):323-328. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.26

Myelodysplastic Syndrome Presenting as Generalized Granulomatous Dermatitis

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):331-335. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.39

Congenital Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Vertical Transfer of Maternal Autoantibody From Mother to Infant

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):337-341. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2010.317
BackgroundEpidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a rare, chronic, autoimmune bullous dermatosis that is caused by autoantibodies against the noncollagenous terminus of the α chain of type VII collagen, resulting in decreased anchoring fibrils in the lamina densa. It classically presents with skin fragility and trauma-induced blisters that are particularly extensive over the distal aspect of the extremities and that heal with milia, dyspigmentation, and scarring, similar in presentation to dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Disease onset is typically in adulthood, although rare cases of childhood disease occur. To our knowledge, a case involving a neonate with congenital EBA has not yet been reported in the literature. We describe a newborn with transient EBA due to the passive transfer of maternal autoantibodies.ObservationsA 2-day-old girl was evaluated for tense blisters and areas of denuded skin that had been present since birth. Her mother carried the diagnosis of EBA. The results of histopathologic analysis, immunofluorescence studies, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed the diagnosis of neonatal EBA. The patient improved with supportive therapy and has not required systemic intervention.ConclusionsAutoimmune neonatal bullous skin disease caused by placental transfer of maternal IgG autoantibodies is rare. It has been reported in neonates born to mothers with pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceus, and gestational pemphigoid. To our knowledge, congenital EBA has not been previously reported. Vertically acquired congenital autoimmune blistering disorders appear to be self-limited and resolve with supportive therapy, concomitant with the presumed clearance of maternal autoantibodies from the neonate's circulation.
Notable Notes

Articles of Faith: Bruiser

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):298. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.8

Reflections on the Hulk’s Green Skin

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):341. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2010.417
The Best of the Best

Top-Accessed Article: Lichen Planopilaris Treated With a Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor γ Agonist

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):284. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.18
Announcement

Dermatologic Photography Tips: Take Great Publishable Images

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):306. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.28

Tips for Taking Publishable Photographs

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):320. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2010.427

New Web Feature: Readers Reply

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):344. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2010.418
This Month in Archives of Dermatology

This Month in Archives of Dermatology

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):278. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.34
Archives a Century Ago

Exposure to the Sun As an Ætiological Factor in Alopecia.

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):281. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.22
Archives Web Quiz Winner

December 2010 Archives Web Quiz Winner

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):292. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.6

Discontinuing Dapsone Treatment and Reintroducing Dietary Gluten in Patients With Dermatitis Herpetiformis in Remission: Comment on “Remission in Dermatitis Herpetiformis”

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):305-306. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.33
Off-Center Fold

Persistent Skin Lesions in a 75-Year-Old Man—Quiz Case

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):345-350. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.35-a

Persistent Skin Lesions in a 75-Year-Old Man—Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):345-350. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.35-b

Multiple Congenital Facial Papules—Quiz Case

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):345-350. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.36-a

Multiple Congenital Facial Papules—Diagnosis

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):345-350. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.36-b

Molluscumlike Papules in a 4-Month-Old Boy—Quiz Case

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):345-350. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.37-a

Molluscumlike Papules in a 4-Month-Old Boy—Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):345-350. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.37-b

Violaceous Plaques in a Collarlike Distribution—Quiz Case

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):345-350. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.38-a

Violaceous Plaques in a Collarlike Distribution—Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):345-350. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.38-b
Correspondence

Making Patients Comfortable With Medical Student Involvement in Their Dermatologic Care

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):357-358. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.11

Alcohol Intake and Risk of Psoriasis: Smoking as a Confounding Factor

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):358. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.15

Alcohol Intake and Risk of Psoriasis: Smoking as a Confounding Factor—Reply

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):358-359. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.16

Giant-Cell Tumor of Skin With Cytoplasmic Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Expression

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):359-361. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.40

Eruptive Lichen Planus Triggered by Acupuncture

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):361-362. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.29

Fixed Drug Eruption on the Penis Due to Oxcarbazepine

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Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):362-364. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.32

Successful Laser Treatment of Vandetanib-Associated Cutaneous Pigmentation

Abstract Full Text
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):364-365. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.30
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