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Comment & Response
June 6, 2019

The Use of Racial and Ethnic Terms—Reply

Author Affiliations
  • 1Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 2Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 3Division of Rhinology, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 4Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2019;21(4):345. doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2019.0131

In Reply We thank Dr Benavides and Mr Gallo for their response to our article1; we concur with the points brought forward and believe their recommendations are essential for future studies. Race and ethnicity are 2 separate identifiers and prone to misuse. We were aware of this issue in constructing our study and elected to compare our 2 cohorts equivalently—white/Caucasian (race) and Hispanic/Latino (ethnicity)—owing in part to the self-identification patterns of our participants and the country in which we conducted our study.1

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