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Comment & Response
June 6, 2019

The Use of Racial and Ethnic Terms—In Reply

Author Affiliations
  • 1Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 2Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 3Division of Rhinology, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 4Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
JAMA Facial Plast Surg. Published online June 6, 2019. doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2019.0131

In Reply We thank Dr Benavides and Mr Gallo for their response to our article1; we concur with the points brought forward and believe their recommendations are essential for future studies. Race and ethnicity are 2 separate identifiers and prone to misuse. We were aware of this issue in constructing our study and elected to compare our 2 cohorts equivalently—white/Caucasian (race) and Hispanic/Latino (ethnicity)—owing in part to the self-identification patterns of our participants and the country in which we conducted our study.1

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