[Skip to Navigation]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.207.129.82. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Views 263
Citations 0
Comment & Response
April 2014

Antihypertensive Medications and Breast Cancer Risk—Reply

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington
JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(4):641. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.13740

In Reply We appreciate the comments of Hugon-Rodin et al and Ji and Chen and respond to the issues they raised. Hugon-Rodin et al raised the question of whether the relationship between β-blocker use and breast cancer risk varied when results were stratified according to type of β-blocker. As reported in our article,1 overall we found no relationship between current use or long-term current use (for ≥10 years) of β-blockers and risk of invasive ductal breast cancer (odds ratio [OR], 0.9 [95% CI, 0.7-1.2], and OR, 1.1 [95% CI, 0.7-1.8], respectively). No appreciable variations in risk were seen when we analyzed risks according to current use of β1-selective blockers vs nonselective β-blockers. Specifically, current users of β1-selective blockers of any duration and for 10 years or more had ORs of 0.9 (95% CI, 0.7-1.2) and 1.2 (95% CI, 0.7-1.9), respectively, and current users of nonselective β-blockers of any duration and for 10 years or more had ORs of 0.8 (95% CI, 0.4-1.6) and 0.8 (95% CI, 0.3-2.4), respectively. However, 90% of control women who were current β-blocker users were users of a β1-selective blocker (the other 10% were current users of nonselective β-blockers), limiting our power to detect differences in risk between β1-selective blockers vs nonselective β-blockers.

×