[Skip to Navigation]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.206.177.17. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Views 403
Citations 0
Comment & Response
August 2014

Real-World Evidence About Potential Psychosocial Harms of Lung Cancer Screening

Author Affiliations
  • 1The Pulmonary Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 2Center for Healthcare Organization & Implementation Research, Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital, Bedford, Massachusetts
  • 3Health Services Research & Development, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon
  • 4Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland
JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(8):1416. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.1643

To the Editor We applaud Harris and colleagues1 for their clearly organized taxonomy of potential harms associated with low-dose computed tomographic screening for lung cancer, which includes “psychological harms” as 1 of 4 categories. The authors point out that patients undergoing surveillance for a screening-detected indeterminate nodule are exposed to a prolonged state of uncertainty but comment that there is limited evidence about the associated psychological harms.

×