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Comment & Response
November 2017

Notice of Retraction and Replacement: Colla et al. Association between Medicare accountable care organization implementation and spending among clinically vulnerable beneficiaries. JAMA Internal Medicine. 2016;176(8):1167-1175

Author Affiliations
  • 1The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire
  • 2Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Manchester, New Hampshire
  • 3The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice, Department of Biomedical Data Science, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire
JAMA Intern Med. 2017;177(11):1702-1703. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.4130

To the Editor We write to report and explain errors that occurred in the Original Investigation, titled “Association Between Medicare Accountable Care Organization Implementation and Spending Among Clinically Vulnerable Beneficiaries,”1 that was published online on June 20, 2016, and in the August 2016 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine. The article reported the results of a cohort study designed to estimate the association between Medicare accountable care organization (ACO) contracts with spending and high-cost institutional use for the overall Medicare population and a clinically vulnerable subgroup of Medicare beneficiaries from January 2009 through December 2013. The main outcome measures of our study were total spending per beneficiary-quarter, spending categories, use of hospitals and emergency departments, ambulatory care–sensitive admissions, and 30-day readmissions. We determined that the Medicare ACO programs were associated with modest reductions in spending and use of hospitals and emergency departments and that savings were realized through reductions in use of institutional settings in clinically vulnerable patients.

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