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Article
January 1919

FURTHER STUDIES CONCERNING THE ESSENTIAL NATURE OF ANTITRYPTIC ACTIVITY OF NORMAL SERUM AND THE PHYSIOLOGIC FUNCTION OF PANCREATIC FERMENTS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Laoratory of Preventive Medicine, University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1919;23(1):33-55. doi:10.1001/archinte.1919.00090180038003
Abstract

A. REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE ON THE ANTITRYPTIC ACTION OF NORMAL SERUM  We have records of a great number of experimental observations on the antitryptic power of normal serum. The significance of this antitryptic power, however, has not yet been determined.The power that normal serum possesses for preventing the action of trypsin, so far as I have been able to learn, was first definitely noticed by Hahn,1 in 1897, who said that this action disappeared on heating after at from 65 to 70 C. Fermi and Pernossi,2 in 1894, had noticed that trypsin rapidly disappeared after injection into the animal body, and that it was destroyed by contact with the tissues in vitro. On the significance of this power, Landsteiner,3 in 1900, stated that the antiaction of serum against trypsin was intimately connected with the albumin fraction, after coming down between half and full saturation of the serum with

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