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Article
July 1919

CRITERIONS FOR DISTINGUISHING THE ENDAMOEBA OF AMEBIASIS FROM OTHER ORGANISMS

Author Affiliations

Major, Sanitary Corps, U. S. Army; Second Lieutenant, Sanitary Corps, U. S. Army; Berkeley, Calif.

From the U. S. Army Laboratory, Port of Embarkation, New York City; Major E. H. Schorer, M. C., U. S. Army, officer-in-charge.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1919;24(1):35-50. doi:10.1001/archinte.1919.00090240038002
Abstract

The practitioner and clinical microscopist undertaking to make a critical diagnosis of the pathogenic ameba, Endamoeba dysenteriae, in either acute, chronic or latent amebiasis, is beset by certain practical and technical difficulties, which, under certain conditions, may become perplexing or even baffling, unless he has had some experience in dealing with the various forms of this ameba and its associated organisms of the human digestive tract. These difficulties have been cleared up somewhat, although the complexities of the situation have been increased somewhat, by the distinction of another very common, tetragenous ameba in human feces in addition to E. dysenteriae, by Wenyon and O'Conner,1 namely, Endamoeba nana, a seemingly nonpathogenic species whose dimensions, number of nuclei, and clear pseudopodia do not differentiate it from the pathogenic form with which it may be associated. We have elsewhere shown2 that this new endameba is the commonest intestinal ameba in American troops, in

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