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Article
July 1919

FEVER AND THE WATER RESERVE OF THE BODY

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1919;24(1):116-128. doi:10.1001/archinte.1919.00090240119009
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  During the course of continued intravenous injections of glucose in dogs1 and man2 described elsewhere, fever was observed under certain conditions, namely, when the rate of sugar injection was sufficiently in excess of the tolerance limit to produce a marked glycosuria with its concomitant diuresis; when the rate of water administration was less than the rate of diuresis and when these conditions were sustained until the animal or man had lost a certain weight by dehydration. Chills were also observed to occur under the same conditions after the body temperature had begun to rise. Both chills and fever were seen to subside when enough additional water was administered. In the experiments on dogs, the rates of sugar administration were controlled by one motor driven pump, the rates of water injection by another pump. The urine was collected and measured continuously by a catheter retained in the bladder which emptied

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