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Article
December 1919

ANTIPYRETICS. I. THE BENEDICT RESPIRATION CHAMBER AT THE NEW HAVEN HOSPITAL

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Department of Pharmacology, Yale University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1919;24(6):611-616. doi:10.1001/archinte.1919.00090290032003
Abstract

Comprehensive studies of antipyretic substances have not been made in recent years. While many questions bearing on relative superiority and manner of employment still require attention, the most inviting problem is, perhaps, the fundamental one of modus operandi. Researches in this direction should broaden our under-standing of fever.

This series of papers on antipyretics will deal especially with clinical investigations of the respiratory exchange. This method of attack throws light from two important angles, the behavior of the heat balance and the nature of the materials burned.

The older antipyretics were, in their day, submitted to extensive investigation,1 chiefly by the method of direct calorimetry. Although quantitative determinations of heat production and elimination were made, attention was not directed toward the respiratory quotient; nothing, therefore, is known of the relation of antipyretic action to the nature of the combustions. In this connection, the carbohydrate metabolism is of special interest in

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