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Article
December 1919

ANTIPYRETICS. II. ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID AND HEAT REGULATION IN NORMAL INDIVIDUALS

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Department of Pharmacology, Yale University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1919;24(6):617-623. doi:10.1001/archinte.1919.00090290038004
Abstract

Acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin), introduced into therapeutics by Dreser,1 is today the most widely used of antipyretic drugs. Its action on the heat regulating mechanism has, however, been subjected but little to careful investigation. That other salicylates possess antipyretic and analgesic properties of a feebler order than those of acetylsalicylic acid was emphasized by the work of Bondi and Katz,2 who associated the difference with the fact that the acetyl ester appears to be absorbed and distributed largely intact, salicylate being but slowly split off in the intestine.

The effects of this substance on the heat regulation of normal and of febrile human subjects, respectively, will be dealt with here and in the third paper of the series. Essentially, they are studies of the respiratory exchange in correlation with the body temperature.

LITERATURE OF SALICYLATES IN RELATION TO HEAT REGULATION  Buss3 investigated the effects of sodium salicylate on the carbon

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