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Article
March 1921

THE OCCURRENCE OF ABNORMAL LEUKOCYTES IN THE BLOOD IN ACUTE INFECTIONSACUTE BENIGN LYMPHOBLASTOSIS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1921;27(3):315-325. doi:10.1001/archinte.1921.00100090052003
Abstract

During the past year we have had several acute infectious cases, running a febrile course, usually mild and all ending in recovery, but in which the blood picture gave rise to considerable apprehension, at the time, as to the ultimate outcome.

The appearance in the blood of cells indistinguishable from those found in acute leukemia, together with enlargement of the lymph nodes and sometimes enlargement of the spleen, with a moderate fever, and absence of definite signs pointing to other disease entity, is a clinical picture that might easily give rise to a grave prognosis.

An excessive proportion of lymphocytes, a reversal of the polymorphonuclear lymphocyte relation, is not infrequently seen in the normal blood of children, and occasionally in adults under pathologic conditions other than lymphatic leukemia. A lymphocytosis is also noted in some cases following the administration of certain therapeutic agents. In early childhood is found the most

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