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Article
September 1924

STUDIES ON THE METABOLISM OF OBESITY: I. THE RELATION BETWEEN FOOD INTAKE AND BODY WEIGHT IN SOME OBESE PERSONS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO; EAST LANSING, MICH.

From the Medical Clinic, the Otto Baer Fund for Clinical Research, and the Nelson Morris Memorial Institute for Medical Research of the Michael Reese Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1924;34(3):267-274. doi:10.1001/archinte.1924.00120030002001
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  There is a difference, at least in degree, between obesity and overweight. Overweight usually results from overfeeding, sedentary habits or a combination of both. Certain cases of obesity unquestionably follow the same causes, but just as unquestionably other cases of obesity are seen which show neither excessive food intake nor lessened energy expense. In such persons the tendency to accumulate and deposit fat seems to be entirely independent of any of the usual causes of increased weight. Both overeating and underexercise are common faults of mankind, yet excessive obesity is comparatively rare. On the other hand, one sees a fairly large number of healthy but thin persons whose food intake is in excess of their calculated caloric requirements, yet who cannot gain weight under any circumstances. The conclusion seems almost inevitable that the maintenance of body weight may be practically independent of the caloric balance, and that obesity may

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