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Article
November 1924

STUDIES ON ACUTE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION: II. ACUTE STRANGULATION

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

From the Departments of Anatomy and Physiology, University of Oregon Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1924;34(5):697-713. doi:10.1001/archinte.1924.00120050114007
Abstract

In the preceding paper1 we have shown that acute intestinal obstruction may be divided both clinically and experimentally into acute simple obstruction and acute strangulation; that the symptomatology, length of life and lethal factors are different in each case. In uncomplicated simple obstruction death is probably due to starvation and its sequelae.

In this paper we report a series of experiments demonstrating that the foregoing factors in simple obstruction play little or no part in acute strangulation but instead that death is due to shock and toxemia. The rapidity with which these factors act varies with the length of intestine involved, the degree of arterial and venous obstruction and the location of the lesion.

No attempt will be made to review the extensive literature on the subject of intestinal obstruction. Only those articles which have dealt with experimentally produced strangulation will be briefly summarized. Von Albeck2 was the first to

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