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Article
May 1925

THE MECHANISM OF REACTION OF NONSPECIFIC PROTEIN AGENTS IN THE TREATMENT OF DISEASE: I. THE INFLUENCE OF VARIOUS AGENTS ON TEMPERATURE AND LEUKOCYTE COUNTS IN NORMAL PERSONS AND IN RABBITS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1925;35(5):598-608. doi:10.1001/archinte.1925.00120110064009
Abstract

Just what portion of a protein stimulates the thermoregulatory center in nonspecific protein therapy is still an open subject for investigation; likewise, the degree of therapeutic activity to be ascribed to fever production is a subject of speculation.

Lüke1 believes that temperatures per se are not damaging factors in infections, for if in infectious diseases the temperature is artificially raised, the disease is seemingly favorably influenced. Antibodies that had gradually disappeared after an infection, or following immunization artificially produced, were again found in the serum after any procedure that increased the body temperature, whether by increasing the the external temperature, by influencing the thermal center of the brain or by injecting pyrogenic drugs. It tends to show that hyperthermia has a direct stimulating effect on the previously formed antibodies, causing the latter to mobilize freely and thus, in turn, to influence the disease processes.

On the other hand, Uddgren,2 as

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