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Article
July 1925

DREYER'S TUBERCLE ANTIGEN: EXPERIMENTS SHOWING THE FAILURE OF THE ANTIGEN TO PROTECT GUINEA-PIGS AGAINST EXPERIMENTAL TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN

From the department of internal medicine and the department of bacteriology, Long Island College Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1925;36(1):121-125. doi:10.1001/archinte.1925.00120130124011
Abstract

The experiments herein reported were undertaken as a preliminary investigation of the problem of the possible efficacy of Dreyer's tubercle antigen in the treatment of guinea-pigs infected with tuberculosis. It was planned to continue the experiments on a larger scale, using a much greater number of animals inoculated with material of varying grades of infectivity, and employing an adequate series of controls. The result of this preliminary study was so discouraging, however, that it was not felt that the labor and expense of an elaborate investigation would be justified. Dreyer's paper attracted considerable attention and yet there has been a great paucity of either confirmatory or contradictory reports by other workers; because of this it was felt that our negative results should be recorded.

Dreyer,1 in 1923, asserted that, as a general rule, most of the failures in vaccine therapy have been with the acid-fast and the gram-positive organisms. Since

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