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Article
September 1925

THE VALUE OF IRON IN ANEMIA: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Medicine of the University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1925;36(3):333-354. doi:10.1001/archinte.1925.00120150042002
Abstract

The question of the absorption and utilization of iron in the formation of hemoglobin has long engrossed the attention of clinicians and physiologists. Unfortunately the results of these researches are far from being in accord in spite of the great amount of labor expended.

If we leave out the earlier work as for the most part too inaccurate to be of service, the modern study begins with Bunge,1 under whose direction Haeusermann studied the question exhaustively. His plan was to feed growing animals food low in iron, generally rice and milk, half of the animals receiving in addition medicinal iron (ferric chlorid). After several months' treatment, the animals were killed and the total hemoglobin determined, and in some of the animals the total iron also. He found that the animals became highly anemic on rice and milk, and that those receiving iron in addition contained no more hemoglobin than the

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