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Article
September 1925

THE EFFECT OF PHENOBARBITAL (LUMINAL) ON BLOOD PRESSURE IN ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION. III.A PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS

From the Departments of Pharmacology and Internal Medicine (Outpatient Department), Washington University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1925;36(3):366-381. doi:10.1001/archinte.1925.00120150075004
Abstract

The history of drug treatment in arterial hypertension has not been an encouraging one. Some of the commonly employed drugs that have enjoyed a certain degree of popularity at one time or another are: tinctures of aconite, veratrum viride and digitalis; potassium iodid and sodium iodid; the nitrites (nitroglycerin, sodium nitrite, erythrol tetranitrate); chloral hydrate; and the recently introduced benzyl esters, such as benzyl benzoate, benzyl acetate and benzyl mandelate. It appears therefore, rather an impertinence to report on yet another drug to be eulogized, tested, doubted and perhaps ultimately discarded.

In the outpatient department at Washington University School of Medicine, two patients were referred to us with arterial hypotension, one a girl, aged 19, suffering from epilepsy, the other an elderly man. The former had a systolic pressure of 88 mm. of mercury, the latter 104 mm. It was noted that both patients were taking phenobarbital (luminal) in fairly

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