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Article
October 1925

GLYCEMIA AS A GUIDE IN THE TREATMENT OF DIABETES MELLITUS: THE PRACTICABILITY OF ROUTINE EXAMINATIONS OF SMALL, EFFECTIVELY PRESERVED SPECIMENS OF BLOOD DRAWN BY THE PATIENT

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, and Wesley Memorial Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1925;36(4):579-584. doi:10.1001/archinte.1925.00120160137007
Abstract

The necessity of maintaining normal blood sugar levels in diabetes mellitus has been urged by a few writers who believe that hyperglycemia, in the treated as in the untreated aglycosuric patient, permits overwork of and resultant damage to the pancreas.1 This goal in treatment conforms with the modern conception of diabetes and with our knowledge of the nature of insulin. The necessity of preventing hyperglycemia is not, however, admitted by all writers even though there is practical agreement as to the necessity of keeping patients aglycosuric. Some authors consider control of glycemia an unnecessary refinement. Many emphasize the importance of blood sugar estimations in diagnosis but consider frequent determinations as a guide in treatment inconvenient and impracticable because of the additional expense and discomfort to the patient. These objections have been largely overcome by the introduction of accurate micro methods that permit the use of small samples of capillary blood,

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