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Article
September 1926

THE EFFECT OF ATROPINE ON GASTRIC FUNCTION IN MAN: A QUANTITATIVE STUDY

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the medical clinic of the Johns Hopkins University and Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1926;38(3):303-320. doi:10.1001/archinte.1926.00120270026003
Abstract

The general fact that atropine may diminish gastric secretion is familiar to all physicians. In the case of animals, accurate observations are on record, but in spite of the extensive use of the drug in the clinic, no exact information is available as to the details of its action in man. The method that we have recently described1 for estimating simultaneously the quantity of gastric secretion and discharge lends itself well to the study of this problem and this article deals with the alterations in gastric activity produced in man by administration of atropine. The study is essentially a pharmacologic one, and no attempt will be made to judge the therapeutic value of the drug in clinical disorders of the stomach.

LITERATURE  Keeton, Koch and Luckhardt2 studied the action of atropine in dogs provided with Pawlow pouches. It was found that large doses of the drug abolished the secretion resulting

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