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Article
December 1926

THE GROWTH OF THE LONG BONES IN CHILDHOODWITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO CERTAIN BONY STRIATIONS OF THE METAPHYSIS AND TO THE RÔle OF THE VITAMINS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1926;38(6):785-806. doi:10.1001/archinte.1926.00120300102009
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  The mainspring of medical research is the interpretation of the phenomena of disease in terms of disordered physiology. The widest gap in the search for this interpretation is seen in diseases of the bony, muscular and blood vascular systems. The innumerable systems of classifying diseases of bone, teeth, muscle and blood vessels indicate that either the clinical and pathologic data or the normal developmental processes have not been elucidated. Our knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of bone is limited. On the one hand, little is known of the nerve supply and lymphatic supply of this tissue. Attempts to interpret the function of the periosteum have produced a series of conflicting views from Hunter1 and Duhamel,2 Cheselden and Haller, Ranvier and Sharpey to Tillier, Macewen3 and Gallie and Robertson.4 The origin of the osteoblast is still undecided, though recent workers such as Stump5 and Fell6 tend to regard the

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