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Article
January 1927

GIARDIASIS IN MAN: ITS PREVALENCE AND RELATION TO DIARRHEA AND TO GALLBLADDER DISEASE

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Department of Comparative Pathology, Harvard University Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1927;39(1):134-158. doi:10.1001/archinte.1927.00130010139010
Abstract

Dobell1 has called attention to the fact that it was Leeuwenhoek in 1861 and not Lamb; who discovered this intestinal flagellate of man. Leeuwenhoek discovered the organism in his own stools.

The nomenclatorial status of this flagellate has been a subject for much discussion. For a considerable period it was known as Lamblia intestinalis (Blanchard, 1888) in honor of Lambl who rediscovered the organism in 1859; then by Giardia intestinalis (Lambl) Alexeieff, 1914, which Dobell believes to be its proper name, and by Giardia enterica by Kofoid.2 In a study of this question made by Boeck and Stiles,3 the conclusion was reached that Giardia lamblia, Stiles, 1915, and first used by Kofoid and Christiansen4 was the proper scientific name of this intestinal flagellate of man.

MORPHOLOGY  Different species of Giardia have been found parasitic in man, dogs, cats, rabbits, rats, mice and frogs, and while they vary from each other

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