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Article
March 1927

THE RED CELL COUNT IN ARTHRITISFIRST PAPER

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1927;39(3):421-428. doi:10.1001/archinte.1927.00130030106009
Abstract

In a series of previous communications, the suggestion has been advanced by Pemberton1, and evidence has been deduced by Pemberton, Cajori and Crouter2, that the arthritic and rheumatoid syndrome is accompanied by disturbances of the peripheral blood flow apparently in the capillary beds, and apparently in the nature of vasoconstriction. It became desirable, therefore, to determine whether, at the periphery, any reflection of this condition could be obtained in the corpuscular elements of the blood in regard to morphology, number or other factors. It seemed possible that some reflection of any circulatory disturbances present in arthritis might be obtained by studying the blood first issuing after a quick stab of moderate depth and by contrasting it with the subsequently appearing blood representative of the general circulation.

The observations here reported were made accordingly during a study of the red cell counts of patients with arthritis as compared with the red

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