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Article
March 1927

STUDIES ON PERITONITIS: I. PRODUCTION OF EXPERIMENTAL PERITONITIS AND SURVIVAL FOLLOWING INTRAPERITONEAL INJECTION OF BACILLUS COLI

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Medicine, National Research Council; CLEVELAND

From the Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Western Reserve University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1927;39(3):446-448. doi:10.1001/archinte.1927.00130030131012
Abstract

Attempts have been made to produce experimental peritonitis by the intraperitoneal injection of bacteria into rabbits (Wegner,1 Benians2 and others) and into dogs (Noetzel3). The results have been conflicting, some investigators reporting rapid death; others, survival of the animals. The discrepancy is probably due to the variability in the numbers, type and pathogenicity of the organisms used as well as to the nature of the fluid employed in the suspension of the bacteria. Later work has shown that the intraperitoneal injection of relatively large quantities of broth cultures of virulent Bacillus coli will kill rabbits quickly without inducing severe peritoneal reaction (Steinberg and Ecker4). The same applies to guinea-pigs and to rats (unpublished experiments—Steinberg).

This study was undertaken to determine the conditions necessary for the production of fatal peritonitis in the dog by the intraperitoneal injection of bacteria.

EXPERIMENTAL WORK  The micro-organism used in this investigation was a strain of

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