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Article
April 1927

CHRONIC ACIDOSIS IN RABBITS AND IN DOGS: WITH RELATION TO KIDNEY PATHOLOGIC CHANGE

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Department of Pathology, Harvard University Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1927;39(4):550-563. doi:10.1001/archinte.1927.00130040088008
Abstract

Change in the ability of the kidney to eliminate acids has been recognized as one of the fairly constant symptoms of renal disease. Palmer and Henderson1 report an abnormally high acidity of the urine caused by a decrease of urinary ammonia in patients with nephritis usually of the glomerular type. The same investigators,2 also Sellards,3 Hösslin,4 and Peabody,5 find that the amount of alkali which must be ingested before the urine becomes alkaline is increased in nephritis. Sellards reports that this is particularly true in interstitial renal injury. Austin and Cullen6 review the literature and draw the conclusion that nephritis gives rise to a disturbance of the acid base equilibrium, and that it may lower both the alkali reserve and the plasma Ph.

These investigators and many others, while recognizing the constant appearance of a disturbed acid excretion, have supposed that this was a consequence of the renal damage. Fischer,7

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