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Article
May 1927

SEVERE CHRONIC GLOMERULAR NEPHRITIS: WITHOUT HYPERTENSION, CARDIAC HYPERTROPHY OR RETINAL CHANGES: REPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From The Mayo Foundation.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1927;39(5):741-747. doi:10.1001/archinte.1927.00130050138011
Abstract

For many years medical teaching has emphasized the association of hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and retinal changes in the severe cases of chronic glomerular nephritis. These observations have been so reliable in most cases, especially in those with marked retention of nitrogen, that physicians have learned to rely on them as valuable aids in differential diagnosis, and to regard one or more of these three observations as almost necessary for a correct diagnosis of chronic glomerular nephritis with uremia. Rare exceptions to this general rule, however, have long been recognized. In 1905, Müller1 mentioned the association of tuberculosis, acute sepsis, typhoid fever and ascending renal infections with some cases of chronic diffuse nephritis in which elevation of blood pressure or cardiac hypertrophy did not occur. In certain of these cases the greater part of the kidney was destroyed, but true uremia was rare.

In 1908, Jores2 showed that the degree of

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