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Article
August 1927

CALCIUM STUDIES IN JAUNDICE: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE EFFECT OF PARATHYROID EXTRACT ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF CALCIUM

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Medical Service of Dr. Thomas McCrae and the Department for Diseases of the Chest, Jefferson Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1927;40(2):129-139. doi:10.1001/archinte.1927.00130080003001
Abstract

In recent years considerable progress has been made in the study of jaundice, but comparatively little is known about the details of the chemical processes involved. The tendency to prolonged bleeding in jaundiced patients has long been known. Obviously this fact is of practical importance, since it adds greatly to the operative risk in a condition that often requires surgical treatment. It is generally believed that the hemorrhagic tendency is intimately related to some fault in the availability and utilization of calcium, although the exact mechanism is far from being well understood.

REVIEW OF PREVIOUS OBSERVATIONS  Calcium exists in the blood stream in several forms: ionized and unionized, diffusible and nondiffusible, free and combined. According to Howland,1 calcium, phosphoric acid and carbon dioxide are present in the blood in a finely balanced equilibrium, illustrated by the following equation:Wells2 states that the calcium salts are held partly in solution, partly

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