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Article
August 1927

BLOOD SUGAR: COMPARISON OF BLOOD SUGAR CURVES FOLLOWING INGESTION AND INTRAVENOUS INJECTION OF GLUCOSE

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Laboratory of the Department of Neuropathology, Harvard Medical School and the Medical Service of the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1927;40(2):182-194. doi:10.1001/archinte.1927.00130080056005
Abstract

The degree of hyperglycemia that follows the administration of glucose is commonly used as a measure of the efficiency of the sugarutilizing mechanism of the body. The method ordinarily employed in performing this test is to measure the concentration of sugar in the blood at intervals after the ingestion of a certain amount of glucose. The criticism has long been made that the speed with which glucose is absorbed from the intestinal tract may vary. For example, Beeler and others1 have demonstrated that an hour after the ingestion of glucose, from 22 to 68 per cent may be aspirated from the stomach. The amount may vary in different persons and in the same person from time to time. However, they fail to show that the amount of glucose recovered is inversely related to the height of glycemia. It is well known, on the contrary, that the ingestion of varying amounts

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