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Article
September 1927

YELLOW ATROPHY OF THE LIVER: ACUTE, SUBACUTE AND HEALED

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.

From the Department of Pathology, Vanderbilt University Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1927;40(3):377-385. doi:10.1001/archinte.1927.00130090126009
Abstract

Acute yellow atrophy of the liver is a relatively rare malady in its clinically recognizable form, and when it is of a sufficient degree of severity to exhibit its classic clinical picture, it is almost invariably fatal. There are reasons for believing, however, that this disease of obscure etiology may exist in forms which are not of such rarity or fatality as are usually ascribed to it.

For many years pathologists have described cases in which the lesions of the liver indicated a healing or healed stage of acute yellow atrophy, pointing to the probability, if not proving to the satisfaction of all, that recovery from a severe attack of the disease may occur. In 1895, Marchand1 clearly recognized the hyperplastic, regenerative nature of large nodules of hepatic cells which are commonly found in such livers, and which in some instances seem sufficient to carry on the function of the

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