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Article
September 1927

POLLINOSIS: CONSTITUTIONAL AND LOCAL FACTORS

Author Affiliations

RICHMOND, VA.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1927;40(3):386-396. doi:10.1001/archinte.1927.00130090135010
Abstract

The wide prevalence of hay-fever alone would justify presentation of any new concept offering possibilities of increased therapeutic efficiency. Conservative statisticians estimate that fully 1 per cent of the population of the United States is afflicted with hay-fever.1 The malady is sufficiently incapacitating, but when it is considered that 65 per cent of all persons with hay-fever finally become asthmatic,1 the need for further developments in treatment becomes even more obvious. Interest in these sufferers is not alone humanitarian, for the economic loss to the victim is often great. Those who do not have hay-fever know well the debilitating effect of an ordinary acute coryza, and realize the struggle of those who must work at full efficiency while semiprostrated for weeks or months with an unrelenting rhinitis. Even the welcome asylum of the hay-fever resort, usually located in a heavily timbered area in which weeds were few, has in great

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