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Article
January 1928

CHRONIC ULCERATIVE COLITIS WITH REFERENCE TO A BACTERIAL ETIOLOGY: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1928;41(1):75-96. doi:10.1001/archinte.1928.00130130078008
Abstract

Chronic ulcerative colitis is an involvement of the large intestine and is of unknown etiology. The disease usually begins in the rectum, sometimes at the mucocutaneous border of the anus; it may remain localized in the rectum or it may extend upward. Anatomically, the process is characterized by primarily involving the mucosa, the condition varying from edema and hyperemia with easy bleeding to miliary abscesses with subsequent discrete, petechial ulcers and "pocklike" scarring.1 In some instances, there is an extension to the other layers of the intestine, resulting in the narrowing of the lumen of the affected part by extensive fibrosis. Myocardial changes and metastatic involvement of joints may occur.2 Clinically, this disease is characterized by diarrhea—continuous or intermittent—with blood, pus, mucus, emaciation, debility, progressive anemia and at times pyrexia.

From time to time numerous investigators in different, and sometimes widely divergent, fields have made varied attempts to ascertain the

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