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Article
February 1928

CONGENITAL MALFORMATIONS OF THE GALLBLADDER: REPORT OF THREE CASES OBSERVED BY CHOLECYSTOGRAPHY

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1928;41(2):198-209. doi:10.1001/archinte.1928.00130140060003
Abstract

Any method of precision used in the diagnosis of disease has possibilities far surpassing its immediate application. The physician, however, is chiefly concerned with its immediate value to his patient. While this attitude is entirely commendable, the fact that a positive diagnostic method may become an instrument of investigation in the hands of the clinician should, nevertheless, be recognized. The application of radiology to the stomach has modified the conception of the anatomy of this organ. Radiology has added to the knowledge of gastric physiology, and has enabled physicians to observe the reactions of the stomach to drugs.1 The clinician has thus been enabled to add considerably to the knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the stomach and of the modifications of it caused by drugs. Radiology has, therefore, increased his usefulness to medicine, and rendered him less dependent on the anatomist and on the experimenter with laboratory animals.

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